John Brennan’s confirmation hearing is “a very sobering moment” says Jeremy Scahill

On Thursday [Feb 7th] at the Senate confirmation hearing, nominee for next Director of the CIA, John Brennan, defended Obama’s counterterrorism policies, including the administration’s increased use of armed drones and its targetted killings of American citizens. And whilst Brennan refused to acknowledge that waterboarding is a form of torture, he was nevertheless forced to admit that he had not tried to stop its use during the time he was a top CIA official under President George W. Bush.

On Friday, Democracy Now! spoke to Jeremy Scahill, investigative journalist, producer and writer of the documentary film, Dirty Wars: The World is a Battlefield, and author of Blackwater: The Rise of the World’s Most Powerful Mercenary Army, and also the forthcoming book, Dirty Wars. Reminding us that Brennan “has served for more than four years as the assassination czar,” Scahill summed up Thursday’s hearing as “total kabuki oversight”:

Well, you know, if you—if you look at what happened yesterday at the Senate Intelligence Committee, I mean, this is kabuki oversight. This was basically a show that was produced by the White House in conjunction with Senator Feinstein’s office. I mean, the reality was—is that none of the central questions that should have been asked of John Brennan were asked in an effective way. In the cases where people like Senator Angus King or Senator Ron Wyden would ask a real question, for instance, about whether or not the CIA asserts the right to kill U.S. citizens on U.S. soil, the questions were very good. Brennan would then offer up a non-answer. […]

But at the end of the day, I mean, I can’t say I was surprised at what happened on Capitol Hill, but it really was more or less a love fest between the most powerful senators, when it comes to intelligence operations in the U.S., and John Brennan, a man who could not get confirmed last time Obama tried to make him CIA director, because of very serious questions about his views on and role in the torture program under the Bush administration— [he] has served for more than four years as the assassination czar, and it basically looked like they were discussing purchasing a used car on Capitol Hill. I mean, it was total kabuki oversight. And that’s a devastating commentary on where things stand right now.

I would invite Senator Feinstein and other members of the Intelligence Committee to travel to Abyan province in Yemen, where I was a few months ago, and meet with the Bedouin villagers of al-Majalah, where more than 40 people were killed, several dozen of them women and children, their bodies shredded into meat with U.S. cluster bombs, and then come back and go on national television and talk about single digits. There were over 40 people killed in one strike alone. And you know what? That wasn’t even a drone strike. That was a cruise missile strike. Everyone is talking about drones these days and obsessed with drones. The U.S. uses AC-130 gunships, night raids, Tomahawk cruise missile strikes. Some of the most devastating strikes were not even drone attacks.

So, you know, this Congress is totally asleep at the wheel when it comes to actually having any effective oversight. You know, they allowed John Brennan to say repeatedly, “Well, I’m not a lawyer,” while simultaneously saying, “Everything we’ve done is perfectly legal.” And then they say, “Well, what about torture?” And he goes, “Well, I’m not a lawyer, and that has legal implications.” I mean, what kind of a show is this? I mean, what does this say about our society when this is the extent of the debate we can have when an administration in power has asserted the right to kill U.S. citizens and foreigners alike around the world without trial? I mean, it’s devastating. It should be a very sobering moment for all of us.

Click here to read the full transcript or to watch the interview on the Democracy Now! website.

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Filed under drones, Jeremy Scahill, USA, Yemen

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